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Describe a Moment of Change

June 7, 2017

And how you dealt with it.

Or at least I hope that is what the question was. Now that I think back, I hope it didn’t read a Moment of Challenge. But I think my answer might still apply.

I had my first of what I hope will be two interviews for a 12-month position at the school board. This was one of the questions.

My answer?

A chuckle. Then I answered, “I go through great change every 75 days!”

I spoke about how the girls and I work as a unit, stronger together. I spoke about some times getting only 12 hours notice. About putting myself aside to help my daughters adjust to life without the Chief. For 21 years. I talked about how we as a family have discussed the ramifications of what a 12-month job would mean for us, especially while the Chief was at sea.

You have to have routine but you have the be flexible enough for the changes that pop up. Or challenges.

Next up I hope to be one of two candidates called in on Friday for a follow-up interview with the Big Man. A decision will then be made either late Friday or on Monday before the School Board Meeting. Sigh. I hate waiting. Good thing T1 is getting her wisdom teeth out and I have that and house cleaning to occupy my time.

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De Ja Vue

June 1, 2017

I don’t speak French so hopefully that is the correct spelling.

This time last year I was anxiously awaiting news on a job I thought I was a shoe-in for and I convinced the Chief that an 8 year-old borzoi NEEDED me to adopt her.

Long story short, my current position (not the one I had applied for in May) is being eliminated as the school no longer meets the requirements for the federal funding. Yesterday I just got word that the other position is coming open again. I am definitely jumping at the chance. I’m not sure how the whole transfer thing works but I was told that every effort would be made to secure a new position. Hopefully, fingers and toes crossed, this will work this time.

Second, someone posted pictures of a new foster greyhound on the group FaceBook page. He is adorable. Yes, I said HE. A big goofy 4 year old male. I brought T1 in to see his pictures and she agreed–we should try to get him or another male. I pretty much submitted my application that moment, same as last year. The Chief is just laughing at me. A male. And he should be going back to sea before he has a chance to train this one and get him integrated into the pack with Simi-Ruthie (borzoi) and Hedwig (greyhound).

I know. We just lost Crookshanks at the end of March. Is it too soon? Simi and Hedwig are finally getting along. Simi still has issues. Are we upsetting the delicate balance by bringing in another dog? We definitely can’t get another female who might challenge Simi for alpha status.

I have never had a male dog before. I’m excited.

De Ja Vue. Nerve-wracking. Exciting. Stressful. Impatient. I am all those things.

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Convocation

May 25, 2017

For the first time, the Chief has been asked to attend the convocation ceremony at a local high school to present a welcome certificate to a graduating senior who will be attending USMMA in the summer. Maybe he’s been asked before but he’s never been home this time of year (which doesn’t bode well for him being home next May/June for T1’s graduating season).

It’s a good thing he has his new khaki uniform and shoulder boards. I thought he looked rather handsome this morning. When I asked if I could take his picture he said “No.” Bummer.

The Chief also took it upon himself to find a USMMA challenge coin to present to the future midshipman.

A challenge coin is a small coin or medallion (usually military), bearing an organization’s insignia or emblem and carried by the organization’s members. Traditionally, they are given to prove membership when challenged and to enhance morale. In addition, they are also collected by service members. In practice, challenge coins are normally presented by unit commanders in recognition of special achievement by a member of the unit. They are also exchanged in recognition of visits to an organization.[1]

T1 actually has a classmate that hopes to be appointed to USMMA next year. I think it would be so cool if the Chief was the one to present to him as well. Keeping my fingers and toes crossed that the Chief will even be home for T1!

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Reading Across America

May 24, 2017

At my new job there are various committees… one being Read Across America Day/Dr. Seuss’s Birthday (March 2nd). About three days before this fun event the committee met. I was just an interested party, not really a committee member. (Come to think of it, I haven’t been assigned to any committees yet…)

I came up with the grand idea to “Read” across America by finding a native-born children’s author from each of the 50 states and Washington, DC. Grand is the word. Little did I know what a monumental task this would be and not something I could just bang out in a day or two.

Over the course of most of March and April I searched and searched–mainly Famous Birthdays and Wikipedia, followed by Amazon. Four states: Alaska, Arizona, Montana, and Nevada had no readily available children’s authors born in their respective states. Arizona could a least claim the late great Barbara Park–author of the Junie B. Jones series–as having lived and died in Arizona.

I created and had laminated small posters with the state name, author, outline of the state (free from www.theus50.com), and an image of the book cover either from Amazon, Wikipedia, or the author’s website. I also created a blog. I hope to review all the books either myself or by students. I also hope someone from Alaska, Arizona, Montana, and Nevada will find my humble blog and let me know about their children’s book.

I also hope that authors of minorities and different genres chime in. I was a little worried it would be a list of “old, dead, white guys.” And sometimes those old, dead white guys weren’t without controversy: Joel Chandler Harris’s Uncle Remus, for example; he brought African American stories to the general public but he was white. (Ultimately, he was not included for the state of Georgia.) I did find some variety–graphic novels (El Deafo by CeCe Bell), poetry, Native American (Circle of Wonder: A Native American Christmas Story by N. Scott Momaday), biography (Rosa Parks by Eloise Greenfield), classics (Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder), and modern favorites (Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief by Rick Riodan).

Sadly, no merchant mariner books and authors were “famous” enough to pop up. Maybe that will be my next project!

I hope you enjoy this new blog!

Reading Across America Blog

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