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Her Hero

September 18, 2012

T2’s appointment went well. I love, LOVE her doctor. He answered all my questions about what the results mean and what tests would be next. He took such a thorough family history–even still I think Mom and I forgot some things (makes you want to go write everything down for the future and keep it on hand at all times!). And he was so nice to ask Mom about her upcoming treatments for her breast cancer.

Anyway, I’m happy to report that two of T2’s abnormals have already come back normal. We have to wait about 24 hours for the results of the other repeated test. He explained to me what happens next: if normal, “Thanks for playing!”; if not normal, they do what is called a mixed study–to see how her abnormal blood reacts to normal blood. The results tell us which factors or inhibitors are at play. He ordered an additional test to see if she has a syndrome so common most people do not know they have it.

If normal, it was just a virus that she had and I just didn’t wait long enough for it to be completely out of her system. The virus just thinned her blood out a little too much over the summer. She makes platelets and clots so that is okay.

If it is this syndrome, we decide if we need to be a little more proactive when she has viruses or dental work, and we’ll need to monitor “Aunt Flo” when that happens.

If it is this syndrome, it explains a LOT in me!

Okay, so to the hero part. T2’s first writing assignment (yeah, I LOVE this teacher!) was to write about your hero. T2 chose the Chief. I haven’t read it but because I’ve been having conversations with my spoiled princesses about selfishness vs. sacrifices lately, she has snagged on to this idea of the sacrifices the Chief makes for us.

On our way home last night, I got a call from the ship’s number. The Chief was using the expensive SAT phone to call. He did not want to wait until they were in port. He really wanted assurance (as did I) that we were not dealing with a cancer of the blood. I am fairly certain we are not (there is an acquired form of the syndrome that is linked to cancers but she does not have enough other symptoms to lead us in that direction and therefore it is probably the inherited or genetic form). My heart was aching for the Chief. I can’t imagine what he has been dealing with. Did he jump on WebMD like I did? He doesn’t exactly have the support group I have shouting at me to get off there (BTW, I wasn’t supposed to look up information on the syndrome per the doctor’s advice… but I did anyway :P). Staying off WebMD and venting to my friends via FB and requesting prayers helped keep me calm when I really didn’t feel calm. Poor Chief.

So when I hung up I told T2, “Do you realize he called on the SAT phone–we have to pay for that expensive phone call? He wanted to know how you are doing.”

“That’s why he’s my hero.”

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One comment

  1. aren’t we lucky to have satphones? in the old days, there’d be no way to get in touch in an emergency. glad things are looking up!



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